Dr Kita Ashman, Patrick Giumelli and Chloe Frick perform a brush-tailed bettong health check in Yorke Peninsula © WWF-Australia / Ninti Media

Dr Kita Ashman, Patrick Giumelli and Chloe Frick perform a brush-tailed bettong health check in Yorke Peninsula © WWF-Australia / Ninti Media

Tech meets conservation: Using telemetry towers to monitor bettongs

01 May 2022

Keywords
  • south australia
  • technology
  • woylies

A conservation, translocation first! The Marna Banggara project is using telemetry towers to monitor the brush-tailed bettongs that were reintroduced to Yorke Peninsula.

Chloe Frick from the University of Adelaide explains how this technology works.

 

 

This project is jointly funded through the Northern and Yorke Landscape Board, the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program, the South Australian Department for Environment and Water, WWF-Australia and Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife. Other partners actively involved in developing and delivering the project include Regional Development Australia, South Australian Tourism Commission, Zoos SA, FAUNA Research Alliance, BirdLife Australia, Nature Conservation Society of SA, Narungga Nation Aboriginal Corporation, Primary Producers SA, Primary Industries and Regions SA, Conservation Volunteers Australia, Legatus Group, Yorke Peninsula Council, Yorke Peninsula Tourism and the Scientific Expedition Group.

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