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In photos:

In photos: Blossom and Petal return home

17 Sep 2018

Keywords

  • koalas
  • new south wales

It’s always a wonderful feeling releasing a rehabilitated native animal back into the wild. Seeing them take their first steps home is a precious moment, and there’s hope that they’ll live their lives free from danger and won’t find themselves back in the care of animal hospitals.


No one knows this feeling better than Hannah Ryan, a wildlife rescuer from WIRES.

Earlier in September, Hannah helped release Blossom, a mother koala, and her joey Petal, back into the wild in New South Wales. Blossom was found confused by the roadside and severely underweight. But with thanks to Hannah and the team at WIRES, they were able to rehabilitate her back to full health.

 

Check out these beautiful photos from Blossom and Petal’s return home to the wild.

 

Wildlife rescuers Hannah Ryan and Tracey Maguire from WIRES releasing Blossom the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and her joey Petal into the wild at Campbelltown, NSW © WWF-Aus / Leonie Sii

“Blossom came into care with us about 5 months ago. She was found by the side of a busy road, a little bit confused and in a poor body condition, which means she was underweight.”

Blossom the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) being released into the wild at Campbelltown, NSW © WWF-Aus / Leonie Sii

“Releasing any native wildlife back to the wild is incredible. It’s why we do what we do, but releasing koalas is particularly special, as they’re a vulnerable species.”

Blossom the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and her cute koala joey Petal on a eucalyptus tree after being released into the wild at Campbelltown, NSW © WWF-Aus / Alex Weinress

 I’m not sure what the future holds for Blossom and her joey. It’s tough being a koala out in the wild at the moment. They’re increasingly under threat from habitat loss and habitat fragmentation.”

 Blossom the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) climbs a eucalyptus tree as her cute koala joey Petal clings to her after being released into the wild at Campbelltown, NSW © WWF-Aus / Alex Weinress

 “We’re seeing an increasing number of koalas come into care from motor vehicle accidents, dog attacks and stress-related diseases like Chlamydia. But I’m hopeful for Blossom and her joey.

Blossom the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) climbs an eucalyptus tree as her cute koala joey Petal clings to her back after being released into the wild at Campbelltown, NSW © WWF-Aus / Alex Weinress

 “Anybody can contribute to help koalas. The plight of the koalas is all of our fight, and there’s always something we can do. You can plant food trees, and you can slow down while you’re driving. Talk to your local government, let them know that koalas matter to us. Australia’s government has the worst animal extinction rate in the world, so it would be a real tragedy to see koalas added to that list.”

Can't get enough of Blossom and petal?
Check out the video of their release back into the wild below.

 

 

WWF-Australia is working to protect koalas and their habitats from excessive tree-clearing.
 
Will you help koalas like Blossom and Petal have a safe place to call home?


Sign the petition today