Bleached magnificent sea anemone (Heteractis magnifica) with clownfish (Amphiprion percula). Lizard Island, March 2017 © CoralWatch / WWF-Aus

Bleached magnificent sea anemone (Heteractis magnifica) with clownfish (Amphiprion percula). Lizard Island, March 2017 © CoralWatch / WWF-Aus

Coral bleaching on the Reef

Keywords
  • climate change
  • coral bleaching
  • great barrier reef

The Reef is renowned for the beauty and diversity of its vibrant corals. The dazzling array attracts tourists from all over the world. But climate change threatens all that.

Coral bleaching is the ghostly face of climate change – the price we pay for our reliance on mining and the burning of fossil fuels like coal and gas. As our Earth warms, the oceans are heated. If water temperatures remain too hot for too long, corals bleach and die.

The Great Barrier Reef has just experienced the worst coral bleaching event we’ve ever seen. In the pristine northern third of the Reef, scientists have found that, on average, about half of all corals have died.

We can save our beautiful Great Barrier Reef but only if we transition rapidly to clean, renewable energy like solar and wind. This transition must involve setting a target of 100% renewable electricity by 2035 and putting an end to fossil fuel subsidies. The window to save the Reef remains open but it is closing fast.

 

 

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