Australia’s threatened rock-wallabies

Yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus), Australia. rel=
Yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus), Australia.
© Martin Harvey / WWF
Rock-wallabies aren’t found anywhere else on Earth. As Australians, we’re the guardians of this unique group of marsupials. There are currently 16 species and eight subspecies of rock-wallaby living in Australia. They form the largest group of macropods (kangaroos, wallabies and their relatives), representing 22% of the species that remain. Rock-wallabies are an internationally recognised group for the study of species development and chromosome evolution in kangaroos and wallabies.
Yellow-footed rock-wallaby

Once hunted for its fur and also known as the ring-tailed rock-wallaby, this beautiful species was once widespread throughout arid and semi-arid Australia. Today, it is only found in a few isolated rocky outcrops in New South Wales, South Australia and Queensland.
Help save rock-wallabies

One of the most important means of recovery for threatened species and communities is the protection of their habitat.

Two-thirds of Australia is privately-managed rural land. Private landholders play an increasingly important role in the conservation of biodiversity across Australia.
If you manage, live on or own land that is habitat for rock-wallabies, please contact your local Landcare office to find out ways that you can help.

If you don’t live near a rock-wallaby habitat, you can donate to WWF to help us protect endangered Australian species like rock-wallabies.

Black-footed rock-wallaby

Known as the “warru” to the Western Desert Aboriginal people, this rock-wallaby was once widespread in the central desert regions of the Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia. It’s now found only in a few scattered locations.

Herbert’s rock-wallaby

The Herbert’s rock-wallaby is smaller and lighter in colour than the brush-tailed rock-wallaby that is found further south. It generally weighs less than six kilograms. Its distinctive bushy tail, which is about 55 centimetres long, aids balance as it leaps across rocks. Herbert’s rock-wallabies can be found in south-east Queensland.
 
Black-footed rock-wallaby, Western MacDonnell National Park, NT, Australia. 
	© Klein & Hubert  / WWF-Aus
Black-footed rock-wallaby, Western MacDonnell National Park, NT, Australia.
© Klein & Hubert / WWF-Aus

Proserpine rock-wallaby

This rock-wallaby only came to the attention of scientists in 1976 and is found in just a few locations in north-east coastal Queensland. A shy wallaby, it lives on rocky outcrops in dense forests surrounded by more open grassy woodland.

Brush-tailed rock-wallaby


Found in New South Wales, Queensland and critically endangered in Victoria, the brush-tailed rock-wallaby has disappeared from much of the southern and western parts of its range.


What you can do to protect rock-wallabies

If you own, live on or manage land that is habitat for rock-wallabies, please contact your local Landcare office to find out how you can help.

You can also check the volunteer listing for your area to see if there’s any opportunity to help rock-wallabies or other Australian species.

If you don’t live near a rock-wallaby habitat, you can donate to WWF to help us protect endangered species like rock-wallabies.