Baby green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling swimming to the sea still in the shallows of the ... / ©: Jurgen Freund / WWF-Canon

Saving the natural world

WWF’s global mission is to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature by:


Biodiversity comprises all the millions of different species that live on our planet – plants, animals, micro-organisms and humans.

To protect biological diversity, we must protect the environments and ecosystems in which people, plants and animals live.

In this section you will learn about WWF-Australia’s priority species and places, our Indigenous partnerships and how we contribute to global conservation efforts.

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Places You Love Appeal promo / ©: Daniel Battley / ABC Open Tropical North
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Close up of foot of chimpanzee / Close up of underside / sole of human foot (Homo sapiens) / Close ... / ©: naturepl.com / Ingo Arndt / WWF
© naturepl.com / Ingo Arndt / WWF
What is biodiversity?
Biological diversity – or biodiversity - is the variety within and between all species of plants, animals and micro-organisms and the ecosystems within which they live and interact.

Biological diversity – or biodiversity – is the term given to the variety of life on Earth. It is the variety within and between all species of plants, animals and micro-organisms and the ecosystems within which they live and interact.

Yellow-footed rock-wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus), Australia. / ©: Martin Harvey / WWF-Canon
© Martin Harvey / WWF-Canon
Wildlife & habitats
WWF focuses on conserving the world’s natural biodiversity by directly protecting wildlife and their habitats.
Boab tree, Kimberley coast, Western Australia. / ©: Aleks Terauds
© Aleks Terauds
Australian priority places
To protect as much of Australia’s biodiversity as possible, WWF has worked for many years to ensure that Australian governments have in place effective plans, strategies and legislation to safeguard the environment.
Large schooling bigeye jacks or trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus) with green turtle (Chelonia mydas) ... / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Oceans & marine
Oceans and coasts are important to the animals and plants that call them home, but for centuries humans have also reaped large rewards from these environments.
Mountain-ash eucalyptus tree (Eucalyptus regnans), in the morning light, Australia. / ©: Martin Harvey/ WWF-Canon
© Martin Harvey/ WWF-Canon
Forests
WWF-Australia is dedicated to ensuring that Australia plays a positive role in protecting the forests of the Asia-Pacific region well into the future.
Aerial view of forest and rivers, Cape Tribulation National Park, Queensland, Australia. / ©: Martin Harvey / WWF-Canon
© Martin Harvey / WWF-Canon
Protected areas
In changing land or sea use from consumptive to nature conservation, protected areas are the most secure way to save habitat and so ensure the survival of native wildlife.