What were the big WWF stories of 2011?

These are some of the big conservation stories for WWF-Australia – both the successes and the challenges – of the past year.
Snorkeling with whale shark, Ningaloo Marine Park, Western Australia. / ©: Darren Jew
Snorkeling with whale shark, Ningaloo Marine Park, Western Australia.
© Darren Jew

Ningaloo World Heritage listed

Over a decade ago, a group of citizens joined together with environment groups and the people of the region, to launch a campaign to protect Ningaloo Reef from a future of over-development and neglect. 2011 saw World Heritage listing for Australia’s Ningaloo Reef – at last!

Learn more about the Save Ningaloo Reef campaign.
Say Yes campaign placards outside Parliament House - "Say Yes to Clean Energy" and press ... / ©: Belinda Pratten
Say Yes campaign placards outside Parliament House - "Say Yes to Clean Energy" and press conference with environmental leaders. Canberra, 12 October 2011.
© Belinda Pratten

Carbon Price Legislation

Climate change is one of the greatest threats to our environment and the survival of thousands of species. In 2011, after years of tireless work by so many people in the community, Australian leaders took a critical step towards reducing this threat with the introduction of carbon price legislation.

Find out what we’re doing to tackle climate change.
Project Catalyst: Harvesting sugar-cane, Mackay-Whitsunday region.
 / ©: The Coca-Cola Foundation
Project Catalyst: Harvesting sugar-cane, Mackay-Whitsunday region.
© The Coca-Cola Foundation

Project Catalyst

Project Catalyst is a pioneering partnership between WWF, Coca-Cola, Reef Catchments, and a dedicated group of cane farmers in Queensland, to reduce the environmental impact of sugar cane production on the Great Barrier Reef. In 2011 Project Catalyst was recognised with a sustainability partnership award.

Find out how sustainable agriculture is helping protect the Great Barrier Reef.
Bronwyn Orr - third year vet student at JCU - and Dr. Leo Foyle - Senior Lecturer of Veterinary ... / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Aus
Bronwyn Orr - third year vet student at JCU - and Dr. Leo Foyle - Senior Lecturer of Veterinary Public Health - at James Cook University with Roxy the sick turtle.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Aus

Turtle crisis in the Great Barrier Reef

Australian marine turtles on the Great Barrier Reef were hit hard in 2011– facing loss of food, water pollution, disease, entanglement in fishing nets and coastal development. We worked with research partners and traditional owners and to conduct vital research into turtle disease and health, provide emergency care and establish long-term protection for turtles.

Find out more about our work to protect turtles.
MSC certified King prawn caught by South Australia's Spencer Gulf prawn fishery. Photo taken at ... / ©: Peter Trott / WWF-Aus
MSC certified King prawn caught by South Australia's Spencer Gulf prawn fishery. Photo taken at Spencer Gulf prawn fishery launch event in November 2011.
© Peter Trott / WWF-Aus

Sustainable Seafood

Globally WWF works with major seafood buyers, using their purchasing power to secure seafood from sustainable sources and improve the management of the world’s fisheries. We partnered with Coles in 2011 to improve the sustainability of their seafood supply chain, and educate consumers about sustainable seafood choices.

What you can do to help.
This facility is owned and operated by New Britain Palm Oil Ltd. one of the first companies to be ... / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Palm Oil cultivation, Kimbe Bay, West New Britain, Papua New Guinea.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon

Palm Oil Scorecard

In the journey toward a sustainable future for palm oil, a substantial number of companies are making commendable progress to reduce their impact on forests, but some are lagging behind. The 2011 Palm Oil Scorecard is a useful tool for identifying the leaders and lagards – including Australian retailers and manufacturers.

Check out the palm oil scorecard

Earth Hour 2011: Sydney Harbour event. / ©: WWF
Earth Hour 2011: Sydney Harbour event.
© WWF

Earth Hour 2011

Earth Hour 2011 proved to be the most successful event yet, with hundreds of millions of people uniting to protect the planet. We will again turn the lights off for WWF’s Earth Hour on March 31, 2012, demonstrating a truly global community committed to creating a more sustainable planet.

Get involved in Earth Hour 2012!

Food. Water. Energy. For All: WWF and supporters march during the Global Day of Action during ... / ©: WWF-Canon / Zubair Sayed
Food. Water. Energy. For All: WWF and supporters march during the Global Day of Action during COP17, Durban, South Africa. 3 December 2011.
© WWF-Canon / Zubair Sayed

Durban - Global Climate Inaction

At the latest climate talks in Durban, South Africa, global leaders disappointed us by failing to take real action on climate change. In 2012, we will continue to push for a real global deal on climate change, and a future with food, energy and water for all!

Learn more about our work on climate change.
Wave breaking on rock along coast on a windy day, Benijo, Anaga Peninsula, North East Tenerife, ... / ©: Wild Wonders of Europe /Inaki Relanzon / WWF
Wave breaking on rock along coast on a windy day, Benijo, Anaga Peninsula, North East Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, December 2008.
© Wild Wonders of Europe /Inaki Relanzon / WWF

100% Renewable by 2050

A new report from WWF demonstrates how the world can reach the goal of 100% renewable energy by 2050, and that Australia has the potential to produce some of the world's cheapest renewable energy, meeting all its energy demands by 2050. We believe it is essential that we achieve this goal to ensure energy security for all and stem the worst impacts of climate change.

Learn more about a sustainable energy future for Australia

 / ©: Aleks Terauds
Snubfin dolphin in Kimberley's water spitting water.
© Aleks Terauds

Snubfin Dolphin

Last year we nominated Australia’s unique snubfin dolphin to be listed as 'vulnerable to extinction' under environmental laws. Unfortunately in 2011 we didn't get the result the snubfin needed, but haven’t given up. We’re calling for the Australian Government to conduct more research to bring us a step closer to having this rare dolphin protected.

Find out more about this unique species and why WWF wants to see the snubfin dophin protected.