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Existing Abbot Point Coal Port and coal stockpiles, Abbot Point, Queensland © Kiwi / AMCS Collection

Existing Abbot Point Coal Port and coal stockpiles, Abbot Point, Queensland © Kiwi / AMCS Collection

Queensland’s Ports Bill set to rein in dredging and dumping on Reef coast

03 Jun 2015

Keywords
  • marine pollution
  • climate change
  • fight for the reef
  • great barrier reef
  • queensland
  • world heritage

WWF-Australia has welcomed the Sustainable Port Development Bill - introduced in the Queensland Parliament this evening - as a major step forward in protecting the Reef from rampant industrial development, dredging and dumping. 

“With this Bill, the Queensland Government is acting to implement its promise to ban sea-dumping of capital dredge spoil in the entire Reef World Heritage Area,” said WWF-Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman.

“Eighty percent of recent dumping has occurred outside the Marine Park but in the World Heritage Area. This Bill will close that loophole putting an end to most dredge spoil sea-dumping for new projects. It will also place strict limits on dredging and port development along the Great Barrier Reef coast.

“At the state election in January, the people of Queensland voted for stronger Reef protection, so it is pleasing to see this important step taken in Parliament today. We urge all Members of Parliament to support the proposed new laws. 

“Industrialisation, dredging and dumping are significant threats to the Reef.

“The Ports Bill delivers on a number of the Queensland Government’s Reef promises but is silent on two important commitments.

“There is no ban on the highly risky practice of barge-to-ship coal loading, known as trans-shipping.

“Also, while the Bill bans the sea-dumping of dredge spoil from port-related developments it does not ban the sea-dumping of spoil from other developments such as marinas.

“Marinas can generate hundreds of thousands of cubic metres of dredge spoil.

“These issues will need to be quickly addressed. The World Heritage Committee has put Australia on probation.

“UNESCO requires that Australia must report back in 18 months on how it is delivering on its Reef promises.   

“The international community is watching this legislation very closely, to make sure it delivers for the Reef, and so are Queenslanders,” he said.
  
WWF-Australia Media Contact:

 Mark Symons, Senior Media Officer, 0400 985 571

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