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In photos:

In photos: What’s in a name?

02 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • quolls
  • tasmania
  • threatened species

In September, WWF-Australia set out to Tasmania to capture some photos and videos of infant quolls that will be the first generation of quolls to set foot on the mainland for 50 years.

It was a tough job, but someone had to do it. So two of our teammates, Maddy and Laurent hit the road and headed south to Tassie.

To celebrate the return of the eastern quoll to the mainland, WWF-Australia is running a competition for the chance to name two of these mini-marsupials before they start their trip to Jervis Bay next year.

 

On the trip, they learnt that a baby quoll is called a ‘pup’, and that they’re super-cute.

 

Two eastern quoll joeys at the Devils@Cradle conservation facility, Cradle Mountain, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

Adult quolls like this one are about the size of a small cat. This quoll makes its home at Devils@Cradle, near Cradle Mountain.

 

Eastern quoll at the Devils@Cradle conservation facility, Cradle Mountain, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

In the wild, eastern quolls are nocturnal, spending their days in nests in underground burrows or under logs. At Devils@Cradle they have no predators so are comfortable coming out during the day to forage around in their specially designed habitat.

 

Eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) climbs into its nesting box at the Devils@Cradle conservation facility, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

There's a reason this photo is slightly out of focus. Maddy sat down to be level with the quoll, but in the process sat on her phone and smashed it.

 

Eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) at the Devils@Cradle conservation facility, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

Impromptu snowball fight! Snow is a bit of a novelty when you come from Sydney.

 

Snow  at the Devils@Cradle conservation facility, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

It’s likely that these two pups, born and raised at Trowunna Wildlife Sanctuary, will be two of the twenty that will make up the first group to be introduced back to the mainland. These future pioneers need a name, Friday 3 November is your last chance to name these two pups

 

Two eastern quoll joeys at Trowunna Wildlife Park, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

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