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In photos:

In photos: Smile, you're on sensor camera!

28 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • numbat
  • biodiversity
  • quolls
  • threatened species
  • wallabies
  • western australia

Numbats are one of Australia’s many iconic animals. Unfortunately, the widespread clearing of their habitat, as well as feral predators, has led them to become endangered.

 

WWF-Australia has launched a new ‘Numbat Discovery’ research project in partnership with Coles, Murdoch University and the WA Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA). This project is calling on all citizen scientists (that means you!) to help researchers find the elusive and rare numbat.

The Numbat Discovery project is in partnership with Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions and Murdoch University with funding support from Coles and Western Australian Government’s State NRM Program.

 

Fifty camera-traps have been installed in the Upper Warren Region in Western Australia, and when triggered by movement, these cameras take 10 images in a row. Although numbats are supposed to be the star, they’re not the only ones caught on camera.

 

Take a look at some of the different animals enjoying their time in the limelight… and see if you can spot the numbat!

 

Is that a camera? I think it’s a camera.

 

A woylie or brush-tailed bettong (Bettongia penicillata) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, October 2017.

 

Woylie caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

Ah! You got got me!

Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, January 2018.

 

Tammar wallaby caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

My best side

A fox caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, December 2017.

 

Fox caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

There’s more to me than just this

Western grey kangaroo tail (Macropus fuliginosus) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, December 2017.

 

Western grey kangaroo tail caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

Hi mum!

A western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, December 2017.

 

Western grey kangaroo close up caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

Ready for my closeup

A western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, November 2017.

 

Western grey kangaroo caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

Well spotted

A chuditch or western quoll (Dasyurus geoffroii) caught on sensor camera in the Upper Warren region near Manijmup, southwest Australia, December 2017.

 

Chuditch or western quoll caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

They say I’m cold blooded

Goanna (Varanus) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, December 2017.

 

Goanna caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

There’s no me without u

Baby emu and parent (Dromaius novaehollandiae) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, November 2017.

 

Emu and chick caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

I love the nightlife baby

Brush-tailed possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, December 2017.

 

Brush-tailed possum caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

I like that log, that is a nice log.

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) caught on sensor camera, southwest Australia, October 2017.

 

Numbat caught on sensor camera © Anke Seidlitz / DBCA / Murdoch University / WWF-Aus

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Eastern quoll at the Devils@Cradle conservation facility, Cradle Mountain, Tasmania © WWF-Aus / Madeleine Smitham

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