Frequently Asked Questions

WWF's organisation and principles

Q. What do the initials WWF stand for now and when did they change?

Q. Who is WWF-Australia’s President?

Q. Does WWF work on animal welfare issues?

Q. When was WWF-Australia founded and by whom?

Q. What has WWF achieved?

Q. Who is President of WWF-International?

Q. Where is my nearest WWF office?

Q. What are the current WWF campaigns?

Q. Who is WWF?

Q. Who does WWF-Australia work with?

Q. What is the story behind the panda logo of WWF?


Get involved

Q. Are there any job vacancies at WWF?

Q. I’d like to become a supporter but live overseas. How can I set this up?

Q. I’ve raised some money for WWF. Where shall I send the cheque?

Q. What can I do to help the environment?

Q. Can I make a one-off donation to WWF?

Q. I’m doing research for a project and would like some information on your work. How can I source it?

Q. Can I buy WWF products Factorie?

Q. I’d like to make a donation/leave a bequest to WWF. Can you tell me your ABN # and the registered name of your organisation?


My application

Q. I sent in my application to become a supporter of WWF and haven’t received anything. What should I do?

Q. How long does a supporter application take to process?

Q. How can I ensure that I don’t receive telephone calls from WWF?

Q. How can I ensure you don’t pass my details on to other organisations?

Q. Is it possible for you to limit the number of appeal mailings you send me?

Q. How do I advise you of a change of address?

Q. How can I advise you of a change of email address?

Q. How can I ensure that I don’t receive any emails from WWF?

Q. How do I become a member of WWF-Australia?

Q. I’ve set up a direct debit. What date will my donations come out of my account?

Q. Does WWF offer junior membership?

Q. Can I get involved with WWF if I’m under 18?

Q. Is my donation tax-deductible?

Q. Why haven’t I received my end of financial year tax receipt after July?

Q. I joined WWF-Australia through one of your representatives on the street and now have a query. Who should I contact?

Q. What happens after I become a supporter?

Q. Can I change the date of my ongoing monthly donation?

Q. How do I cancel my ongoing monthly donations and how much notice must I give?

Q. Can I get Living Planet delivered by email rather than by post?


How we work

Q. Does WWF offer grants for conservation projects?

Q. How many supporters does WWF-Australia currently have?

Q. I want to run a fundraising event at my school. Can you send me some items to sell or hand out on the day?

Q. I am a teacher/parent/student and would really like some information sent out to me about what WWF does and the species you work with. Can you send me something that will help me with my homework/project?

Q: What approach does WWF-Australia take in making investments to fund conservation work?


Animal adoptions

Q. If I adopt an animal, will I be the only person who adopts that animal?

Q. What animals do you have for adoption?

Q. What do I get if I adopt an animal?

Q. I’ve ordered an adoption and haven’t yet received anything. What should I do?


Face-to-face fundraising

Q. What is face-to-face fundraising?

Q. Does it work?

Q. Why is face-to-face fundraising important to WWF-Australia?

Q. Why do charities use professional collectors, not volunteers?



How to contact us

Q. How do I make a complaint to WWF?


The environment we live in

Q. What is biodiversity?

Q. How does habitat loss affect animals?

Q. What causes species extinction?
WWF's organisation and principles

Q. What do the initials WWF stand for now and when did they change
A. Back when it was founded in 1961, WWF stood for the “World Wildlife Fund”.
However, as the organisation grew throughout the 70s and 80s, WWF began to expand its work to conserve the environment as a whole (reflecting the interdependence of all living things), rather than focusing on species in isolation. In 1986, WWF realised that our name no longer reflected the scope of our activities, and we changed our name to “World Wide Fund For Nature” in all countries except the United States and Canada. The resulting confusion and translation discrepancies across more than 15 languages led to the decision, in 2001, to adopt the original acronym as our one, global name.


Q. Who is WWF-Australia’s President?
A. Robert Purves, AM, BCom is President and has been a member of the Board of Directors since 2010.
He is also former President of WWF-Australia and former Board Member of WWF International.


Q. Does WWF work on animal welfare issues?
A. WWF works to conserve endangered species, protect endangered places, and address global threats to the planet, such as climate change. Much of our work is for the protection of endangered animals in the wild – including the tiger, orang-utan, marine turtle, rock wallaby, dugong, snubfin dolphin - but we do not have the experience or expertise to deal with issues relating to animals in captivity.
While animal welfare is outside our expertise and our legally-binding constitution, we are constantly striving to build a world in which humans live in harmony with nature.
For information about animal welfare issues, we suggest that you contact such organisations as HSI (the Humane Society International), World Animal Protection (formerly WSPA), or the RSPCA (the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), which campaign to end captive animal abuse.


Q. When was WWF-Australia founded and by whom?
A. The concept of a World Wildlife Fund office in Australia was put forward by HRH Prince Philip in 1963, two years after the formation of WWF-International. A WWF office in Australia was established and WWF-Australia was successfully incorporated on June 29, 1978 with a $50,000 grant from the Commonwealth Government and $20,500 in corporate donations. On April 17, 1979, the first annual general meeting of trustees was held at the reception hall of the Sydney Opera House. Sir Peter Scott attended the AGM, commenting on the importance of the recently announced cessation of whaling in Australia.


Q. What has WWF achieved?
A. Throughout the past 50 years, WWF has worked constantly to protect endangered species and habitats and has had many conservation successes. Find out more by going to the WWF-International website to see our work worldwide - http://wwf.panda.org/ and our 50 Big Wins.

Q. Who is President of WWF-International?
A. Yolanda Kakabadse, the former Ecuadorian Minister of Environment, took up her role as the President of WWF-International in January 2010.

Q. Where is my nearest WWF office?
A. For all general, donation or supporter enquiries please contact our Supporter Services team at the WWF-Australia head office:

Sydney
Level 1, 1 Smail Street
Ultimo NSW 2007
PO Box 528
Sydney NSW 2001
Phone: +61 2 8228 6800 or 1800 032 551
Fax: +61 2 9281 0369

Brisbane
Level 1, 17 Burnett Lane
Brisbane QLD 4000

Canberra
Suite 14 Baileys Corner, 143 London Circuit
Canberra City ACT 2600
PO Box 408
Canberra ACT 2601

Melbourne
Level 3, 60 Leicester Street
Carlton VIC 3053

Perth
Panda Cottage - Herdsman Lake
Flynn Street (opp cnr. Selby Street)
Wembley WA 6014
PO Box 4010
Wembley WA 6913


Q. What are the current WWF campaigns?
A. The best and fastest way to find out about our campaigns and current environmental messages is to look on the homepage of our website. You can also look at our supporter magazine Living Planet or contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551.


Q. Who is WWF?
A. WWF is the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organisation, with close to five million supporters and a global network active in more than 100 countries. Our mission is to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature by:
• conserving the world’s biological diversity;
• ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable; and
• promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
The WWF International Network is global, independent, multicultural and non-party political. WWF-Australia’s head office is located in Sydney, with regional offices in Brisbane, Canberra, Melbourne and Perth. Contact details for all offices are listed on the contact page.


Q. Who does WWF-Australia work with?
A. WWF-Australia builds partnerships with local, state and federal governments, Indigenous communities, farmers, business and industry, and other NGOs. We also work with scientists, economists and other conservation groups in order to create solutions to Australia’s environmental problems.
WWF-Australia involves local communities and Indigenous peoples in the planning and execution of our field programs, respecting their cultural as well as economic needs.


Q. What is the story behind the panda logo of WWF?
A. The inspiration for the panda in WWF’s world-recognised logo came from Chi-Chi, a giant panda that had arrived at the London Zoo in 1961, when WWF was being created. Aware of the need for a strong, recognisable symbol that would overcome all language barriers, WWF’s founders agreed that the large, furry animal with her appealing, black-patched eyes would make an excellent logo.
The first sketches were done by the British environmentalist and artist Gerald Watterson in 1961. Based on these, Sir Peter Scott, one of WWF’s founders, drew the first logo, and said at the time: “We wanted an animal that is beautiful, is endangered, and one loved by people around the world. We also wanted an animal that symbolised all that was disappearing in the natural world.”
The black-and-white panda has since come to stand as a symbol for conservation worldwide.


Get involved

Q. Are there any job vacancies at WWF?
A. All job opportunities at WWF-Australia are listed on the jobs page. To find out more about jobs in other WWF offices around the world, visit our job listing on wwf.panda.org


Q. I’d like to become a supporter but live overseas. How can I set this up
A. You can make either a one-off donation or a regular monthly donation on our website if you select the box “Address is outside Australia”. Alternatively, we can set this up over the telephone if you call our Supporter Services team on +61 (0)2 8228 6800. Please be aware that you may incur additional credit card charges per transaction.


Q. I’ve raised some money for WWF. Where shall I send the cheque?
A. Thank you so much for your generosity; we really appreciate your support!
Please send a cheque, made payable to WWF-Australia, to:
WWF-Australia
GPO Box 528
Sydney NSW 2001

Please let us know how you raised the money and remember to include your name and address so that we can send you a thank you letter.


Q. What can I do to help the environment?
A. Visit our tips for eco living page to discover practical ways that you can reduce resource usage and help our living planet. Visit our take action section to find out other ways you can make a difference.


Q. Can I make a one-off donation to WWF?
A. Yes. We welcome and appreciate one off donations. You can make a one-off donation to WWF using your credit card on our secure server by visiting https://donate.wwf.org.au/campaigns/donate/. Alternatively, you can call our Supporter Services team on 1800 032 551 from 9.00am to 5.00pm, Monday to Friday and have your card details handy.


Q. I’m doing research for a project and would like some information on your work. How can I source it?
A. Up-to-date information is available on our website. Unfortunately our conservation officers are unable to allocate time to assist with the many requests we get for detailed information relating to dissertations/research projects.
You can find further information regarding WWF’s global conservation work on our international website at: www.panda.org.
WWF receives many enquiries from students wishing to use our logo. For this reason, we have strict guidelines governing its use. Unfortunately, while members of the public are not able to use the panda logo or photographs from our website, it is fine to download reports and use text from our webpages.


Q. Can I buy WWF products at Factorie?
A. WWF still has an active partnership with Factorie, with investment going into WWF’s turtle conservation efforts in the Great Barrier Reef, however they don’t currently have WWF branded product on shelf due to other product and marketing priorities.


Q. I’d like to make a donation/leave a bequest to WWF. Can you tell me your ABN # and the registered name of your organisation?
A. Thank you! Our ABN# is 57 001 594 074 and our registered business name is World Wide Fund for Nature Australia.
If you are wishing to leave a bequest gift to WWF in your will, it is really helpful if you could contact us to share you intentions. It allows us to keep our records up to date, and to thank you for remembering WWF in your Will. For more information on leaving a bequest, please contact Christine Robinson in our Philanthropy Team. You can reach Christine on 02 8228 6822 or email: bequest@wwf.org.au  
Alternatively, more information on this type of gift can be found on our website: wwf.org.au/bequest/


My application

Q. I sent in my application to become a supporter of WWF and haven’t received anything. What should I do?
A. We’re sorry you haven’t yet received your welcome to WWF. So we can look into this, please contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551. When contacting us, please provide as much information as possible, including your name and address, the gift recipient’s name and address (where relevant), details of when and how you joined WWF.


Q. How long does a supporter application take to process?
A. We endeavour to process your application as soon as possible, butduring busy periods, it may take up to three weeks.


Q. How can I ensure that I don’t receive telephone calls from WWF?
A. WWF uses the telephone  because, we love to talk to our wonderful supporters. It provides us with an opportunity to say “thank you” to the people whose donations are enabling our conservation work to happen.
Also, as a conservation organisation, we are extremely concerned about the amount of paper we send out. The telephone is an environmentally-friendly way of communicating with our supporters - it uses very little energy and does not produce waste.
 WWF is keen to promote the benefits from a conservation viewpoint and to encourage the positive side of this method of fundraising. However, we do appreciate that not everyone wishes to be telephoned. Please contact the Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551 if you would like us to flag our records so that you are not telephoned by WWF.


Q. How can I ensure you don’t pass my details on to other organisations?
A. Simply tell us so we can mark your records to ensure that your details are not passed on to other organisations. Please contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551 if you would like us to do this. If you email or write to us, please remember to include your postal address and Supporter Number so we can locate your record.


Q. Is it possible for you to limit the number of appeal mailings you send me?
A. As well as helping to raise funds, appeals allow us to keep our supporters up-to-date with some of our current conservation work. However, we do appreciate that not everyone wishes to receive appeals and we can stop any appeal mailings being sent to you or restrict them to fewer mailings per year.
You can organise this by contacting our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551. Please note that it will take three weeks for this change to come into effect and you may consequently continue to receive appeal mailings during this time. If you email or write to us, please include your postal address and Supporter Number so we can locate your record.


Q. How do I advise you of a change of address?
A. If you change your address, please let us know by updating your details here: https://donate.wwf.org.au/campaigns/changedetails/ or by contacting our Supporter Services teamby e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551.
Please be sure to include your old address and your Supporter Number so that we can find your correct information.
So we can keep our administrative costs to a minimum, we do not acknowledge changes of address, but we will amend our records accordingly. Please be aware that we may have already selected your name to contact you, so you may receive mail at your former address for up to three weeks.
For your privacy and security, such changes can only be made by you, the supporter, and not by a relative or friend.


Q. How can I advise you of a change of email address?
A. You can organise this by updating your details here: https://donate.wwf.org.au/campaigns/changedetails/ or by contacting our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551 or write to us at WWF-Australia, GPO Box 528, Sydney, NSW, 2001.
If you email or write to us, please remember to include your postal address and Supporter Number so we can locate your record.
For your privacy and security, such changes can only be made by you, the supporter, and not by a relative or friend.


Q. How can I ensure that I don’t receive any emails from WWF?
A. We’re very sorry if you received an unwanted e-mail from WWF-Australia. If you do not wish to receive e-mails from us please contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551.
If you email or write to us, please remember to include your postal address and your Supporter Number so we can locate your record.
For your privacy and security, such changes can only be made by you, the supporter, and not by a relative or friend.


Q. How do I become a supporter of WWF-Australia?
A. You can join WWF online or by contacting our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551. It is also possible to set up a WWF donation as a gift for someone online and over the phone.


Q. I’ve set up a direct debit. What date will my donations come out of my account?
A. Thank you for setting up a direct debit to support WWF’s work. Our direct debits are processed on the 24th of each month. The date of the transaction may show later on your statement. If you would like to skip a donation or change your credit card or account details please contact us at least three days before the 24th of the month.


Q. Does WWF offer junior membership?
A. Unfortunately no, we don’t offer child membership, but many of our younger supporters are animal adopters. To take out an adoption on behalf of someone who is under 18, please visit https://donate.wwf.org.au/campaigns/donate/


Q. Can I get involved with WWF if I’m under 18?
A. If you would like to help WWF but are not yet 18 years old, there are a number of ways you can get involved.
With the support of a parent or guardian, you can take part in or organise an event, visit our fundraising ideas page.
To change your lifestyle in order to live in a more environmentally sustainable way, visit our tips for eco living page.
Measure your footprint to see how the way you live is impacting the planet and what you can do to reduce it.
We would love to be involved with WWF whatever your age!


Q. Is my donation tax-deductible?
A. Yes. Donations of $2 or more are fully tax-deductible. Our Supporter Services team will send monthly givers a tax receipt for all donations received, at the end of the financial year. One-off donations will be receipted shortly after the donation has been processed.


Q. Why haven’t I received my end of financial year tax receipt after July?
A. Your tax receipt is posted out in late July after the June end of financial year. If you still have not received it after this time please contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551, and please let us know if you have changed your address.


Q. I joined WWF-Australia through one of your representatives on the street and now have a query. Who should I contact?
A. Please contact our Supporter Services teamby e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551 and we’ll be happy to assist you.
We will be able to help you more effectively if you can tell us where and when you spoke to our representative. If you agreed to support WWF-Australia by setting up a direct debit, the paperwork you were given will contain this information.


Q. What happens after I become a supporter?
A. As a new supporter, you have become part of a committed movement of visionary people who are helping to preserve some of the greatest creatures to ever walk the planet. With your support, we will move this world into a very different future, one in which humans live in harmony with nature.
If you become a supporter of WWF-Australia, you will receive regular updates on how your donations are making a difference, in our supporter magazine Living Planet. This will also keep you up-to-date on all the latest environmental and wildlife news.


Q. Can I change the date of my ongoing monthly donation?
A. Unfortunately the debit date of ongoing donations can’t be changed, however if you need to skip a monthly donation you can do so by contacting our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551.
If you email or write to us, please remember to include your postal address and Supporter Number so we can locate your record.


Q. How do I cancel my ongoing monthly donations and how much notice must I give?
A. You can cancel your monthly donation by contacting our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au, by phone on 1800 032 551 or by letter to WWF-Australia, GPO Box 528, Sydney, NSW, 2001.
For your privacy and security, such changes can only be made by you, the supporter, and not by a relative or friend.
If you email or write to us, please remember to include your postal address and Supporter Number so we can locate your record.
If you cancel after the 10th of each month, your cancellation will take effect the following month.


Q. Can I get Living Planet delivered by email rather than by post?
A. We post a soft copy of our Living Planet magazine on our website and you can request not to receive a mailed copy by contacting our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au, by phone on 1800 032 551.


How we work

Q. Does WWF offer grants for conservation projects?
A. WWF does not offer grants for conservation projects because our valuable funds are already committed and allocated to a range of Australian and worldwide projects. Additionally, as we are sure you can appreciate, we receive many requests for funding and it is impossible to single out any one project for support.


Q. How many supporters does WWF-Australia currently have?
A. Currently, WWF-Australia has approximately 80,000 supporters.


Q. I want to run a fundraising event at my school. Can you send me some items to sell or hand out on the day?
A. Thank you for thinking of us, unfortunately, we don’t have merchandise available for sale. As a charity, WWF-Australia has limited resources and must ensure our supporter's donations are directed to our conservation projects.
To register your event, please fill in our “Application to Fundraise” form, which can be obtained by e-mailing: enquiries@wwf.org.au or available for download by visiting our “Start your own event” page.
Once your event is approved, we can send you a fundraising kit and supporting brochures about our work to help with your event.


Q. I am a teacher/parent/student and would really like some information sent out to me about what WWF does and the species you work with. Can you send me something that will help me with my homework/project?
A. Thank you for thinking of us. As a conservation organisation, WWF is mindful of its ecological footprint. For this reason, we seek to reduce the amount of hard copy mail we send. You can find a wealth of downloadable reports by going to the publications links on our website. For reports and fact sheets on threatened species and environmental issues from around the world, our international website www.panda.org is a great resource.


Q. What approach does WWF-Australia take in making investments to fund conservation work?
A. Our investment screening process and investment advisors are certified by the Responsible Investment Association of Australia. WWF-Australia has no direct investments in organisations that extract or process fossil fuels.


Animal adoptions

Q. If I adopt an animal, will I be the only person who adopts that animal?
A. An animal adoption is a symbolic gesture. The adoption schemes have animals that act as a figurehead for each species. Each animal represents all the animals that our donors are helping to protect and save. This is the most effective way to ensure that your donations are having the most impact.
To adopt an animal please visit https://donate.wwf.org.au/campaigns/donate/


Q. What animals do you have for adoption?
A. We currently offer five species for adoption:
- tiger
- orang-utan
- pygmy elephant
- turtle
- panda


Q. What do I get if I adopt an animal?
A. Our adoption pack will include:
- A cuddly soft toy (optional)
- An adoption pack
- Updates from the field


Q. I’ve ordered an adoption and haven’t yet received anything. What should I do?
A. We’re sorry you haven’t yet received your adoption welcome pack. Please note it can take approximately three weeks for your adoption welcome pack to be processed and dispatched. Adoptions purchased from WWF are sent via Australia Post as a package that may not fit through your letterbox. Therefore it may be waiting for collection at your local post office. Otherwise, please contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au or phone 1800 032 551.
When contacting us, please provide as much information as possible, including your name and address, the gift recipient’s name and address (where relevant), the species of the animal adopted, details of how you were paying for the adoption and when you sent your application to us.


Face-to-face fundraising

Q. What is face-to-face fundraising?
A. Face-to-face fundraising is where an individual representing a charity invites you to consider making ongoing monthly donations via credit card or direct debit from your bank. This form of fundraising takes place on the street, at home on your doorstep, in shopping centres or at functions. It connects people who want to change the world for the better with people who can change the world for the better. We all like to think we are generous, but in reality, people seldom give spontaneously. No matter how generous we might be after a tsunami or a disaster, most of the time most of us give because someone asks us to. While we have many good intentions, we often need a prompt to turn that into good actions. Face-to-face fundraising provides that prompt. It also provides an opportunity for a rich and informed conversation about how the individual can personally make a real difference to a worthy cause.


Q. Does it work?
A. Face-to-face is our most effective form of fundraising. The personal nature of face-to-face fundraising means that charities can attract many people who they would not otherwise be able to reach through other methods.


Q. Why is face-to-face fundraising important to WWF-Australia?
A. One-off donations are great - we welcome and appreciate them. However, to do our work well, we need a stable, dependable income that allows us to plan for the future. Our face-to-face and telemarketing fundraisers ask the public to make a long-term commitment to give a regular monthly donation. The value of this kind of income cannot be overstated. It means that we can budget and plan for, long-term projects and programs that have the greatest impact on the conservation goals and outcomes we need to achieve.


Q. Why do charities use professional collectors, not volunteers?
A. Very few charities are able to rely on volunteers for their face-to-face fundraising programs – in most cases there simply aren’t enough volunteers, and there are many issues around volunteers performing such a task. A few charities in Australia choose to run their own in-house face-to-face fundraising program, while most, like WWF-Australia employ professional agencies to help recruit supporters. Either way, there is a cost to run the program. Whether it’s an in-house or outsourced program, time and resources are needed to recruit, train, manage and maintain fundraisers to ensure our face-to-face fundraiser is as knowledgeable and professional as possible when representing a globally respected charity such as WWF-Australia.


How to contact us

Q. How do I make a complaint to WWF?
A. We’re sorry that you’re not happy with the service you have received.
We do not view complaints in a negative light but more as a means of monitoring and improving our performance and gauging public perceptions. We see our complaints procedure as an essential part of our focus on supporter satisfaction and believe that managing complaints effectively is a way of maintaining and building relationships with the supporters on whom WWF depends.
We would be grateful if you could contact our Supporter Services team by e-mail: enquiries@wwf.org.au, by phone on 1800 032 551, or by letter to WWF-Australia, GPO Box 528, Sydney, NSW, 2001.


The environment we live in

Q. What is biodiversity?
A. Life on earth is one great, interdependent system. Living species interact with and depend on non-living components of the planet like the atmosphere, ocean, fresh water, rocks and soil. Biological diversity, or biodiversity, is the variety of the world’s organisms in all its forms, including genetic diversity. It is the blanket term for the planet’s natural biological wealth.
For more information on biodiversity click here.


Q. How does habitat loss affect animals?
A. Habitat loss affects the life of an animal in a number of ways.
Developing land for human needs reduces the amount of natural space. As natural space diminishes, so does habitat diversity - the great variety of forests, bushlands, grasslands, wetlands, and deserts that exist in nature. The result is both a decline in the number of species and fewer individuals of those species surviving.
Humans have substituted native species with ones that better meet their needs: sheep, cattle, cotton, wheat and sugar. While this has advantages for society, it has upset the natural balance of those ecosystems.
Development has an indirect impact on land it leaves untouched. As land is converted, it is fragmented into smaller and more isolated patches of natural space. Fauna and flora populations have evolved, and continue to evolve, in conjunction with their surroundings. Any change in their habitat will affect their ability to survive.


Q. What causes species extinction?
A. Many factors impact on our wildlife and contribute to the loss of species.
The main causes of extinction are landclearing, invasive species, salinity, altered fire regimes, pollution, urbanisation of land, the discharge of nutrients and sediments into our waterways and coastal areas, and climate change. Many of these act upon both ecosystems and species at the same time, which can accelerate the rate of impact and reduce the ability of ecosystems to adapt to changes.