WWF-Australia’s 5 year plan

Our new five year plan has identified a small number of important initiatives that will capitalise on WWF-Australia's strengths, and aims to place us at the forefront of new ways of living that contribute to a more secure and sustainable future for all. We will rally the whole organisation around these six High Impact Initiatives:
The Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest continuous barrier reef and a much loved global icon. Covering 344,000 square kilometres, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park is home to a wide range of important species including sharks, dolphins, turtles and dugong.

As the impacts of climate change become more pronounced, the ability of the Reef to withstand these impacts will be compromised.

However, by working to improve the quality of water entering the reef from nearby catchments, ending poor fishing practices, and improving the protection of ecologically important marine species, WWF can improve the resilience of the reef to the impacts of climate change, and ensure that the reef is healthy for generations to come.

Lizard Island, aerial view. Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea, Australia. / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Lizard Island, aerial view. Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea, Australia.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Southwest Australia Ecoregion

The Southwest Australia Ecoregion, stretching from Shark Bay in the north, past Perth and right across to the South Australian border, is one of the most biologically diverse areas on Earth.

It is home to more than 150,000 species of plants and animals, many of which are found nowhere else on earth. The region has been identified as one of the world’s top 34 biodiversity hotspots: a place of exceptional natural wealth facing exceptional threats to that wealth.

WWF has conducted an in-depth analysis of biodiversity throughout the region, and the results of this analysis will be used as a tool to guide conservation in the region by a broad range of practitioners. This approach will make the most of our strengths in developing productive partnerships, in species conservation, and in our work on the ground with landholders and land managers to protect, restore and manage high value habitats.

Salmon gum and rainbow, Yerecoin, Western Australia. / ©: WWF-Australia / Mike Griffiths
Salmon gum and rainbow, Yerecoin, Western Australia.
© WWF-Australia / Mike Griffiths
Heart of Borneo

Focused on the centre of the island of Borneo, the Heart of Borneo Initiative covers 220,000 square kilometres of equatorial rainforest, including some of the most biologically diverse habitats on Earth.
It is one of only two places on Earth where elephants, orang-utans and rhinoceros share the same territory.

Over the past two decades, much of Borneo’s forest cover has been fragmented and cleared to sell timber and create plantations for the production of palm oil and paper pulp.

WWF-Australia will support the Heart of Borneo Initiative in three ways: ensuring strong Australian Government investments in Borneo to facilitate climate adaptation and mitigation programs; ensuring Australian business and industry involvement in the region is sustainable; and supporting on-ground species recovery projects.

Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) with infant, Riverine forest by the Kinabatangan river, Sukau ... / ©: Gerald S. Cubitt / WWF-Canon
Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) with infant, Riverine forest by the Kinabatangan river, Sukau region.Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia.
© Gerald S. Cubitt / WWF-Canon
The Coral Triangle and South West Pacific

The Coral Triangle is the global centre of marine biodiversity, richer in tropical marine species than the Great Barrier Reef.

The Coral Triangle is also the source of marine resources and livelihoods for 150 million people across the region. It is home to the world’s largest tuna fishery and, through its migratory marine species like turtles and whales, has a direct connection with Australia’s tropical oceans.
The people and biodiversity of the small island developing states of the Pacific are also some of the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

WWF-Australia will work to secure a network of tropical marine reserves in Australian waters and throughout the region, ensuring vital habitats and corridors for key marine species are protected. We are working to secure sustainable management practices for priority fisheries such as tuna. Thirdly, in partnership with the Australian government and WWF offices in the region, we will identify opportunities for investment in adaptation projects to build the resilience of threatened species and critical habitats to climate change.

Large schooling bigeye jacks or trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus) with green turtle (Chelonia mydas) ... / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Large schooling bigeye jacks or trevallies (Caranx sexfasciatus) with green turtle (Chelonia mydas) and diver at the edge of the reef Sipadan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. 21 June 2009
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Market Transformation

In response to increasing exploitation of natural resources worldwide, and the impacts of unsustainable consumption on the environment, WWF-Australia will focus on improving the sustainability of five key commodities: sugar, beef, seafood, palm oil, and pulp, paper and tropical timber.

Globally, approximately 70% of the volume of trade in these commodities is controlled by about 400 companies in the supply chain, including producers, processors, traders, manufacturers, brand owners and retailers.
WWF is well-placed to influence these companies to develop innovative and sustainable business models that promote positive environmental outcomes for some of the world’s most valuable and biodiverse places.

By engaging with governments, WWF will seek the policy reforms needed to support this market transformation work, and through partnerships with retailers, we will ensure consumers are better informed about sustainable products as they become available.

MSC certified King prawn caught by South Australia's Spencer Gulf prawn fishery. Photo taken at ... / ©: Peter Trott / WWF-Aus
MSC certified King prawn caught by South Australia's Spencer Gulf prawn fishery. Photo taken at Spencer Gulf prawn fishery launch event in November 2011.
© Peter Trott / WWF-Aus
Climate Change

Climate change poses one of the greatest threats to Australia’s species and ecosystems, and without strong national and international action to significantly reduce global pollution, WWF-Australia’s other priority initiatives will be at risk of failing to achieve their objectives.

Over the next five years WWF will work with key stakeholders, including politicians, businesses, WWF supporters and the Australian public: to transition Australia to 100% renewable energy; to establish low-carbon action plans at the national level, and also for major business and industry sectors; and to ensure the Australian government contributes to securing a fair, ambitious and legally binding global agreement to tackle global climate change.

 

Ice melting in Antarctica / ©: Greg & Kate Bourne / WWF-Aus
Ice melting in Antarctica
© Greg & Kate Bourne / WWF-Aus
In addition to our six High Impact Initiatives:

We will continue our annual domestic Earth Hour campaign, we will play a leading role in WWF's global Antarctica and Southern Ocean program, and we will work towards comprehensive protection for the unique biodiversity and Indigenous values of Australia's Kimberley region. There will also be opportunities to explore new approaches to conserving Australian freshwater ecosystems, reducing biodiversity loss from mining, protecting the forests of New Guinea, exploring our influence on the emerging global role of China, and engaging our youth in conservation.