People and nature programmes

The following are some examples of people and nature programmes that WWF-Australia has supported in the Asia Pacific Region.

Coastal Fisheries Improvement in Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea

WWF, with support from AusAID, is working to improve the livelihoods and food security of people living in coastal fishing communities in Gizo (Western Province, Solomon Islands) and Madang (Papua New Guinea). Installing nearshore Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) that can be easily fished by coastal communities for food and income is a high priority for government agencies in the region. WWF is working with selected communities, fisheries agencies and other partners to document the social, economic and ecological impacts of the nearshore FADs for coastal communities. WWF is also exploring sustainable financing mechanisms (such as micro-financing) and new business opportunities—especially with regard to women—that can result from more sustainable fish catches associated with nearshore FADs.

Melanesian Sustainable Livelihood

WWF had a long running successful programme with support from AusAID focused on sustainable forest management in Papua New Guinea (Central, East Sepik, Western, Gulf, National Capital District, Southern Highlands, Simbu and Eastern Highlands Provinces) and Solomon Islands (Western and Choiseul Provinces).
The programme’s success has been built on long-term partnerships aimed to improve community livelihoods and with governments and businesses to support sustainable forest management.
Work in PNG resulted in the development of High Conservation Value Forest criteria to enable mapping and the development of National Forest Certification Service in PNG to combat illegal logging and promote of best management practices.
Other work in PNG has included support for: sustainable development of eaglewood trade; community re-afforestation of degraded grasslands; and building capacity of non-governmental organisations.
In the Solomon Islands (SI), a gap analysis was completed of protected areas, upon which the subsequent forestry work there was based; promoting social economic and environmental best practices in sustainable forest management and palm oil production.


Mangrove replanting in SI and PNG

WWF with support from AusAID has recently been working with communities and local government in Manus Province and Madang Lagoon in Papua New Guinea and in Gizo (capital of Western Province in Solomon Islands) to plant and rehabilitate mangroves. By doing so we will be conserving biodiversity, enhancing climate change resilience and disaster risk reduction in these coastal communities, with the aim to improve livelihoods of these coastal communities.


Coral Triangle and South West Pacific fishery programme

WWF-Australia’s Coral Triangle and South West Pacific fishery programme focuses on areas where we believe our engagement will have the most impact on fisheries sustainability, livelihoods, poverty reduction and local food security.
We are doing this by focusing on three areas:
1) Offshore fisheries governance (mainly tuna);
2) A community focus to coastal and small-scale fisheries; and
3) Promoting best fishing practices using the market transformation approach.


Heart of Borneo – sustainable mining, forestry, oil palm


WWF-Australia is supporting the Heart of Borneo Initiative which covers an area of 220,000 km2. The Initiative aims to effectively manage and conserve through a mosaic of protected areas, productive forests and other sustainable land-uses, for the benefit of people and nature.
This will be conducted through international cooperation led by the Bornean governments, supported by industry and sustained by a global effort. WWF-Australia is focusing on three key areas that recognise the very real links between the Heart of Borneo and Australian institutions, industries, consumers and public.


Rio+20 - UN Conference on Sustainable Development


World leaders needed to react to the natural crises we are facing, rethink how we use and manage the Earth's resources, and redesign a sustainable future. By shifting economic incentives we can begin to address rapidly increasing pressures on our planet, as described in the WWF Living Planet Report 2012.
WWF urged Rio+20 to deliver on the following priorities: valuing natural wealth; removal of government subsidies that are harmful to both the economy and the environment; improving environmental governance; addressing food, water and energy security; and strengthening ocean governance.
The urgency for action was missed and Rio+20 was an opportunity squandered by governments to get serious and build on the success of the first Earth Summit in 1992, and the sustainable development successes since then.
However, there were successes outside the negotiating rooms and exciting leadership being demonstrated in communities, cities, governments and companies that are laying the foundation to protect our environment, alleviate poverty, and move us toward a more sustainable planet.


Pakistan Floods

In 2010 floods devastated Pakistan, with up to 20 million people affected. In response to the widespread damage wreaked and the extensive relief and rehabilitation measures required, a detailed Flood Response Strategy was developed by WWF-Pakistan.
Many active WWF projects and community partners were affected by the floods, but WWF-Pakistan is extremely well mobilised in the field and has the capacity to work with partner communities to efficiently deliver emergency assistance. WWF-Australia supporters contributed generously towards WWF-Pakistan’s Flood Response.
The response consisted of three stages:
1) Humanitarian relief to partner communities – directly supporting 3,500 people and many more in partnership with other organisations;
2) ecological assessments in high priority ecosystems – the poorest people are most reliant on the intact natural environments, this covers assessments of the flood impacts in three ecologically significant areas; and
3) assistance in sustainable ecological restoration and social restoration for partner communities - which aims to assist in ecologically and socially sustainable rehabilitation in the affected areas, and includes the use of a Green Recovery and Reconstruction Training Toolkit developed in partnership with humanitarian, development and environmental organisations.


Sustainable Hydropower in Lancangjiang (Upper Mekong River)


Sustainable hydropower development can be an important contribution to the world's future development and energy security. WWF-China, with support from AusAID, is working to advance sustainable hydropower in China.
The WWF network has been a key partner in the development of a sustainability assessment tool to measure and guide performance in the hydropower sector - the Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol. This Protocol has been released by the International Hydropower Association. WWF-China is working with,strategic Chinese hydropower partners to explore the possibility of conducting an assessment using the Protocol in one of Huaneng’s dams on the Lancangjiang.
A river snakes its way through East Sepik province. The photo was taken towards the end of the dry ... / ©: Brent Stirton / Getty Images / WWF
A river snakes its way through East Sepik province. The photo was taken towards the end of the dry season, and the river bed is as visible as the remaining water. The clear land around the river may be floodplain, although some areas have been destroyed by forest fires, or cleared for timber and agriculture. Papua New Guinea. December 2004.
© Brent Stirton / Getty Images / WWF
Split level of a shallow coral reef and mangroves with local West Papuan woman in her dugout canoe. ... / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Split level of a shallow coral reef and mangroves with local West Papuan woman in her dugout canoe. North Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia. 16 Feb 2010.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Fisherman carrying yellowfin tuna, Jacana tuna fish landing. Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines. ... / ©: Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Fisherman carrying yellowfin tuna, Jacana tuna fish landing. Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines. 24 April 2009.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF-Canon
Aerial view of palm oil plantation on deforested land, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia. 2007 / ©: naturepl.com /Juan Carlos Munoz / WWF
Aerial view of palm oil plantation on deforested land, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia. 2007
© naturepl.com /Juan Carlos Munoz / WWF
To send a strong message to world leaders, Heads of State and government negotiators WWF inflated a ... / ©: Chris Chaplin / WWF
To send a strong message to world leaders, Heads of State and government negotiators WWF inflated a giant hot air balloon (28 metres high), covered in a large banner which reads "#GetSeRIOus+20" and "#LevemaSéRIO+20" at a key location on the way into the Rio Earth Summit. 19 June 2012, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
© Chris Chaplin / WWF
Kot Addu Relief Work. Pakistan flood 2010. / ©: WWF-Pakistan / Zafar Ali
Kot Addu Relief Work. Pakistan flood 2010.
© WWF-Pakistan / Zafar Ali
Dam and hydropower facilities in the giant panda areas, China. / ©: Zhang Ming
Dam and hydropower facilities in the giant panda areas, China.
© Zhang Ming