Doha delivers on Kyoto but falls short on ambition



[news_posted_on] 09 December 2012  | 
WWF-Australia today welcomed the launch of the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, but expressed strong disappointment that the Doha climate summit failed to deliver stronger emission cuts or increased financial support for the world’s poor and vulnerable.

WWF’s Climate Change Policy Manager Will McGoldrick said while Doha had delivered some important progress on structural and process issues, it fell short on ambition.

“With the world currently on track to experience 4-6°C of global warming this century, it is very disappointing that Doha failed to deliver any real progress to reduce global emissions,” Mr McGoldrick said.

“The take home message from Doha is that governments need to re-double efforts and increase the pace of negotiations to meet the deadline of having a much stronger treaty in place by 2015. They also must keep open the prospect of limiting global warming to well below 2°C.”

Mr McGoldrick said Australia provided some positive momentum in the lead up to the Doha summit by agreeing to join phase-two of Kyoto, but then failed to announce any new financial support to help developing countries reduce emissions and build resilience in the face of a changing climate.

“As negotiations continue in the coming years the international community will be looking to Australia to commit strength to its 2020 emissions target and commit more financial assistance for developing countries,” Mr McGoldrick said.

WWF-Australia contacts:
Kellie Caught, National Manager – Climate Change, 0406 383 277
Daniel Rockett, Senior Media Officer, 0432 206 592, drockett@wwf.org.au
The world's largest solar power facility, named Solar 2, which produces 10 megawatts of electricity. The 1'926 heliostats provide 81'400 square meters of sun-capturing surface area. Daggett, near Barstow, California, Mojave Desert, United States of America
The world's largest solar power facility, named Solar 2, which produces 10 megawatts of electricity. The 1'926 heliostats provide 81'400 square meters of sun-capturing surface area. Daggett, near Barstow, California, Mojave Desert, United States of America
© Kevin SCHAFER / WWF-Canon Enlarge

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